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Defend Your Data: Spring clean your digital identity

Information Technology Services wants to help you get a jump start on your spring cleaning. Join us for free coffee on March 28 from 9 a.m. to noon in the Mountainlair as part of our new Cats, Coffee, and Cybersecurity monthly event that offers cybersecurity tips from Spy Cat to better protect your online privacy. This third event will focus on how to make sure your online presence is safe and to #defendyourdata.

Don’t have time to stop by? Follow @StaySafeOnline and their #UpdateMeow campaign, as well as @WVUITServices and take these tips from Spy Cat: 

1.     Update your anti-virus protection. All students, faculty, and staff can download Sophos for free on up to three devices at freeav.wvu.edu

2.     Update your passwords to include 12 characters with capital and lower-case letters, numbers and special characters. Check your password strength at howsecureismypassword.net.

3.     Disable geotagging on apps such as Snapchat and Facebook. Don’t let others know where you are.

4.     Clear your Internet cache of cookies and passwords. Enable private browsing to automatically delete cookies, temporary Internet files and browsing history upon closing a window.

5.     Delete any Wi-Fi connections you no longer use, especially public ones so you don’t accidentally end up on unsecured networks.

6.     Clean up your social media accounts by removing friends you don’t know, your children’s names, birthdate, address, maiden name and phone number.

7.     Create new habits to avoid oversharing in the future. Posting your 10 favorite concerts or 25 interesting facts about yourself, provides information other can  use to answer your security questions, reset your passwords, and access your accounts.

8.     Remove the third-party apps that have access to your Facebook data. If you have ever selected the option to “log in with Facebook” instead of creating a new account or have taken a quiz to find out what state you should live in, chances are that the company behind that app has your personal information and can see your friends, profile picture and networks.

9.     Make a list of all online accounts you have and delete those you haven’t used in six months, like MySpace.

10.  Set a reminder to periodically change passwords, delete cookies, and review privacy settings for social media accounts on a regular basis.

Learn more about managing your privacy and security settings for the things you share online at DefendYourData.wvu.edu.